Hyderabad Pearls and More

Aggressive development plans have led to it becoming a modern, economically significant city, with particularly strong IT activity.

Post By : Diamond World News Service On 21 January 2011 1:39 PM

|*Celebrated for its heritage and culture, Hyderabad has been for long known as “Pearl City” due to its thriving pearl trade. Aggressive development plans have led to it becoming a modern, economically significant city, with particularly strong IT activity. So much so that it has also earned for itself the sobriquet of Cyberabad. But the business activity in the city, far from detracting from its other facets, has only made it a lucrative market as well. Nilan Singh provides glimpses of Hyderabad, a fascinating mix of the old and the new. *| Think Hyderabad and there is not one word, one association, but many that spring to the mind – the world famous Nizam’s jewellery collection, Hyderabadi cuisine, heritage monuments like the Charminar, beautiful lakes, the IT and BPO sector, Tollywood – the Telugu film industry, and much much more. And of course the pearls, the bangles, and the jewellery. Today, Hyderabad, the capital of Andhra Pradesh is ranked the 2nd best Indian city for doing business (in 2009). It is the sixth most populous city and sixth-most populous urban agglomeration as of 2010. Hyderabad ranks 93rd (as of 2008) in the List of richest cities in the world by GDP (PPP) with US$60 bn and sixth in India. In terms of GDP per capita (PPP), Hyderabad ranks 4th in India with US$6,428. Yest, in order to understand how Hyderabad has emerged as an important centre for jewellery, it is necessary to take a glimpse of its history. Hyderabad was founded by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah in 1591 on the banks of the Musi River, five miles from Golconda. The Qutb Shahi dynasty, founders of the Kingdom of Golconda, ruled the Deccan for almost 171 years. The seven rulers of the Golconda Kingdom, were all patrons of learning and were great builders. Together they contributed to the growth and development of Indo-Persian and Indo-Islamic literature and culture in Hyderabad. It was during the Qutb Shahi reign that Golconda became one of the leading markets in the world of diamonds, and pearls, apart from other products. After the Mughals in Delhi established control over the Deccan, it was left to be governed by a subedar or viceroy of the Mughal Emperor. The Governor of the Deccan, bore the title of Nizam-ul-Mulk. In 1724, Feroze Jung Asif Jah, declared his independence from Mughal rule to set up the Asif Jahi dynasty, thus becoming the first Nizam. It was in 1769 that Nizam Ali Khan Asif Jah II, shifted the capital to Hyderabad. The seven Nizam's of the Asif Jahi dynasty ruled the Deccan for nearly 224 years, right up to 1948, when they acceded to the Indian Union., post Independence.

The Nizams ensured the growth of Hyderabad both culturally and economically. The artificial lakes which are so famous today, like the Nizam Sagar, Tungabadra, Osman Sagar, Himayath Sagar, and others were constructed during their reign. Survey work on the Nagarjuna Sagar had also begun during this time. Hyderabad, under the Nizams, was the largest princely state in India, and in area was as large as England and Scotland put together. The Nizams were also great patrons of jewellery and like many of the other rulers of India’s erstwhile princely states had built up a fabulous collection of jewellery which has become renowned all over the world. “It was since the Nizams’ times that Hyderabad became so important for pearls,” says Devender Kumar Agarwal, Managing Partner Krishna Pearls & Jewellers. “Mughal jewellery used a lot of pearls and their importance grew.” Devender, who has 14 jewellery stores in Hyderabad and two in Mumbai, says that Hyderabad has pearls of every range – large and small, cultured and natural. “It developed as a world famous drilling centre and pearls from Japan and China were imported to the city, for processing,” says he. Jeetender Agarwal of Dreamz Diamond Jewellery agrees that “The processing and finishing of pearls in Hyderabad is very good, and they are supplied worldwide from here.” Apart from the processing of pearls, Hyderabad has also achieved expertise in the manufacture of pearl jewellery. Devender strongly believes that the manufacturing in Hyderabad is undergoing modernisation as well as developing rapidly on the design front. “From the simple five string and seven string necklaces, to modern, westernised jewellery for exports, Hyderabad produces it all,” says Devender. “Here you will find jewellery suited to the European markets as well as that for the traditional Indian market.” Jeetender adds, “The city is also famous for its antique and Victorian jewellery and its diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery.” He informs us that there are an estimated 50,000 Bengali babus working in the industry in the city. The diamond jewellery market particularly has grown substantially he feels. The city of Hyderabad has emerged as an important wholesale market for pearls, pearl jewellery as well as the Victorian style and diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery. “Traders from the North as well as from other southern cities come here to buy jewellery,” says Jeetender.

Hyderabad’s emergence as a city where many businesses have shifted and which has a sizable BPO and IT segment has meant that it has also developed as a healthy retail market. According to Jeetender, “It is the biggest retails markets in south India, with 50% sales to NRIs.” From the old bazaars around the Charminar to the newer market of Kothaguda and the modern malls springing up in the city, Hyderabad has a thriving jewellery retail trade. Laad bazaar, near Charminar is famous for its bangles and pearls. The Panjagutta area is also lined with shops retailing pearl jewellery. Jeetender concludes by saying “It is the design sense and the honesty of the Hyderabadi people that have made it such an important market.” Like the city itself, which has many aspects and strengths, the jewellery trade of Hyderabad also is richly multi-faceted.

|*Celebrated for its heritage and culture, Hyderabad has been for long known as “Pearl City” due to its thriving pearl trade. Aggressive development plans have led to it becoming a modern, economically significant city, with particularly strong IT activity. So much so that it has also earned for itself the sobriquet of Cyberabad. But the business activity in the city, far from detracting from its other facets, has only made it a lucrative market as well. Nilan Singh provides glimpses of Hyderabad, a fascinating mix of the old and the new. *| Think Hyderabad and there is not one word, one association, but many that spring to the mind – the world famous Nizam’s jewellery collection, Hyderabadi cuisine, heritage monuments like the Charminar, beautiful lakes, the IT and BPO sector, Tollywood – the Telugu film industry, and much much more. And of course the pearls, the bangles, and the jewellery. Today, Hyderabad, the capital of Andhra Pradesh is ranked the 2nd best Indian city for doing business (in 2009). It is the sixth most populous city and sixth-most populous urban agglomeration as of 2010. Hyderabad ranks 93rd (as of 2008) in the List of richest cities in the world by GDP (PPP) with US$60 bn and sixth in India. In terms of GDP per capita (PPP), Hyderabad ranks 4th in India with US$6,428. Yest, in order to understand how Hyderabad has emerged as an important centre for jewellery, it is necessary to take a glimpse of its history. Hyderabad was founded by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah in 1591 on the banks of the Musi River, five miles from Golconda. The Qutb Shahi dynasty, founders of the Kingdom of Golconda, ruled the Deccan for almost 171 years. The seven rulers of the Golconda Kingdom, were all patrons of learning and were great builders. Together they contributed to the growth and development of Indo-Persian and Indo-Islamic literature and culture in Hyderabad. It was during the Qutb Shahi reign that Golconda became one of the leading markets in the world of diamonds, and pearls, apart from other products. After the Mughals in Delhi established control over the Deccan, it was left to be governed by a subedar or viceroy of the Mughal Emperor. The Governor of the Deccan, bore the title of Nizam-ul-Mulk. In 1724, Feroze Jung Asif Jah, declared his independence from Mughal rule to set up the Asif Jahi dynasty, thus becoming the first Nizam. It was in 1769 that Nizam Ali Khan Asif Jah II, shifted the capital to Hyderabad. The seven Nizam's of the Asif Jahi dynasty ruled the Deccan for nearly 224 years, right up to 1948, when they acceded to the Indian Union., post Independence.

The Nizams ensured the growth of Hyderabad both culturally and economically. The artificial lakes which are so famous today, like the Nizam Sagar, Tungabadra, Osman Sagar, Himayath Sagar, and others were constructed during their reign. Survey work on the Nagarjuna Sagar had also begun during this time. Hyderabad, under the Nizams, was the largest princely state in India, and in area was as large as England and Scotland put together. The Nizams were also great patrons of jewellery and like many of the other rulers of India’s erstwhile princely states had built up a fabulous collection of jewellery which has become renowned all over the world. “It was since the Nizams’ times that Hyderabad became so important for pearls,” says Devender Kumar Agarwal, Managing Partner Krishna Pearls & Jewellers. “Mughal jewellery used a lot of pearls and their importance grew.” Devender, who has 14 jewellery stores in Hyderabad and two in Mumbai, says that Hyderabad has pearls of every range – large and small, cultured and natural. “It developed as a world famous drilling centre and pearls from Japan and China were imported to the city, for processing,” says he. Jeetender Agarwal of Dreamz Diamond Jewellery agrees that “The processing and finishing of pearls in Hyderabad is very good, and they are supplied worldwide from here.” Apart from the processing of pearls, Hyderabad has also achieved expertise in the manufacture of pearl jewellery. Devender strongly believes that the manufacturing in Hyderabad is undergoing modernisation as well as developing rapidly on the design front. “From the simple five string and seven string necklaces, to modern, westernised jewellery for exports, Hyderabad produces it all,” says Devender. “Here you will find jewellery suited to the European markets as well as that for the traditional Indian market.” Jeetender adds, “The city is also famous for its antique and Victorian jewellery and its diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery.” He informs us that there are an estimated 50,000 Bengali babus working in the industry in the city. The diamond jewellery market particularly has grown substantially he feels. The city of Hyderabad has emerged as an important wholesale market for pearls, pearl jewellery as well as the Victorian style and diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery. “Traders from the North as well as from other southern cities come here to buy jewellery,” says Jeetender.

Hyderabad’s emergence as a city where many businesses have shifted and which has a sizable BPO and IT segment has meant that it has also developed as a healthy retail market. According to Jeetender, “It is the biggest retails markets in south India, with 50% sales to NRIs.” From the old bazaars around the Charminar to the newer market of Kothaguda and the modern malls springing up in the city, Hyderabad has a thriving jewellery retail trade. Laad bazaar, near Charminar is famous for its bangles and pearls. The Panjagutta area is also lined with shops retailing pearl jewellery. Jeetender concludes by saying “It is the design sense and the honesty of the Hyderabadi people that have made it such an important market.” Like the city itself, which has many aspects and strengths, the jewellery trade of Hyderabad also is richly multi-faceted.

|*Celebrated for its heritage and culture, Hyderabad has been for long known as “Pearl City” due to its thriving pearl trade. Aggressive development plans have led to it becoming a modern, economically significant city, with particularly strong IT activity. So much so that it has also earned for itself the sobriquet of Cyberabad. But the business activity in the city, far from detracting from its other facets, has only made it a lucrative market as well. Nilan Singh provides glimpses of Hyderabad, a fascinating mix of the old and the new. *| Think Hyderabad and there is not one word, one association, but many that spring to the mind – the world famous Nizam’s jewellery collection, Hyderabadi cuisine, heritage monuments like the Charminar, beautiful lakes, the IT and BPO sector, Tollywood – the Telugu film industry, and much much more. And of course the pearls, the bangles, and the jewellery. Today, Hyderabad, the capital of Andhra Pradesh is ranked the 2nd best Indian city for doing business (in 2009). It is the sixth most populous city and sixth-most populous urban agglomeration as of 2010. Hyderabad ranks 93rd (as of 2008) in the List of richest cities in the world by GDP (PPP) with US$60 bn and sixth in India. In terms of GDP per capita (PPP), Hyderabad ranks 4th in India with US$6,428. Yest, in order to understand how Hyderabad has emerged as an important centre for jewellery, it is necessary to take a glimpse of its history. Hyderabad was founded by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah in 1591 on the banks of the Musi River, five miles from Golconda. The Qutb Shahi dynasty, founders of the Kingdom of Golconda, ruled the Deccan for almost 171 years. The seven rulers of the Golconda Kingdom, were all patrons of learning and were great builders. Together they contributed to the growth and development of Indo-Persian and Indo-Islamic literature and culture in Hyderabad. It was during the Qutb Shahi reign that Golconda became one of the leading markets in the world of diamonds, and pearls, apart from other products. After the Mughals in Delhi established control over the Deccan, it was left to be governed by a subedar or viceroy of the Mughal Emperor. The Governor of the Deccan, bore the title of Nizam-ul-Mulk. In 1724, Feroze Jung Asif Jah, declared his independence from Mughal rule to set up the Asif Jahi dynasty, thus becoming the first Nizam. It was in 1769 that Nizam Ali Khan Asif Jah II, shifted the capital to Hyderabad. The seven Nizam's of the Asif Jahi dynasty ruled the Deccan for nearly 224 years, right up to 1948, when they acceded to the Indian Union., post Independence.

The Nizams ensured the growth of Hyderabad both culturally and economically. The artificial lakes which are so famous today, like the Nizam Sagar, Tungabadra, Osman Sagar, Himayath Sagar, and others were constructed during their reign. Survey work on the Nagarjuna Sagar had also begun during this time. Hyderabad, under the Nizams, was the largest princely state in India, and in area was as large as England and Scotland put together. The Nizams were also great patrons of jewellery and like many of the other rulers of India’s erstwhile princely states had built up a fabulous collection of jewellery which has become renowned all over the world. “It was since the Nizams’ times that Hyderabad became so important for pearls,” says Devender Kumar Agarwal, Managing Partner Krishna Pearls & Jewellers. “Mughal jewellery used a lot of pearls and their importance grew.” Devender, who has 14 jewellery stores in Hyderabad and two in Mumbai, says that Hyderabad has pearls of every range – large and small, cultured and natural. “It developed as a world famous drilling centre and pearls from Japan and China were imported to the city, for processing,” says he. Jeetender Agarwal of Dreamz Diamond Jewellery agrees that “The processing and finishing of pearls in Hyderabad is very good, and they are supplied worldwide from here.” Apart from the processing of pearls, Hyderabad has also achieved expertise in the manufacture of pearl jewellery. Devender strongly believes that the manufacturing in Hyderabad is undergoing modernisation as well as developing rapidly on the design front. “From the simple five string and seven string necklaces, to modern, westernised jewellery for exports, Hyderabad produces it all,” says Devender. “Here you will find jewellery suited to the European markets as well as that for the traditional Indian market.” Jeetender adds, “The city is also famous for its antique and Victorian jewellery and its diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery.” He informs us that there are an estimated 50,000 Bengali babus working in the industry in the city. The diamond jewellery market particularly has grown substantially he feels. The city of Hyderabad has emerged as an important wholesale market for pearls, pearl jewellery as well as the Victorian style and diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery. “Traders from the North as well as from other southern cities come here to buy jewellery,” says Jeetender.

Hyderabad’s emergence as a city where many businesses have shifted and which has a sizable BPO and IT segment has meant that it has also developed as a healthy retail market. According to Jeetender, “It is the biggest retails markets in south India, with 50% sales to NRIs.” From the old bazaars around the Charminar to the newer market of Kothaguda and the modern malls springing up in the city, Hyderabad has a thriving jewellery retail trade. Laad bazaar, near Charminar is famous for its bangles and pearls. The Panjagutta area is also lined with shops retailing pearl jewellery. Jeetender concludes by saying “It is the design sense and the honesty of the Hyderabadi people that have made it such an important market.” Like the city itself, which has many aspects and strengths, the jewellery trade of Hyderabad also is richly multi-faceted.

|*Celebrated for its heritage and culture, Hyderabad has been for long known as “Pearl City” due to its thriving pearl trade. Aggressive development plans have led to it becoming a modern, economically significant city, with particularly strong IT activity. So much so that it has also earned for itself the sobriquet of Cyberabad. But the business activity in the city, far from detracting from its other facets, has only made it a lucrative market as well. Nilan Singh provides glimpses of Hyderabad, a fascinating mix of the old and the new. *| Think Hyderabad and there is not one word, one association, but many that spring to the mind – the world famous Nizam’s jewellery collection, Hyderabadi cuisine, heritage monuments like the Charminar, beautiful lakes, the IT and BPO sector, Tollywood – the Telugu film industry, and much much more. And of course the pearls, the bangles, and the jewellery. Today, Hyderabad, the capital of Andhra Pradesh is ranked the 2nd best Indian city for doing business (in 2009). It is the sixth most populous city and sixth-most populous urban agglomeration as of 2010. Hyderabad ranks 93rd (as of 2008) in the List of richest cities in the world by GDP (PPP) with US$60 bn and sixth in India. In terms of GDP per capita (PPP), Hyderabad ranks 4th in India with US$6,428. Yest, in order to understand how Hyderabad has emerged as an important centre for jewellery, it is necessary to take a glimpse of its history. Hyderabad was founded by Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah in 1591 on the banks of the Musi River, five miles from Golconda. The Qutb Shahi dynasty, founders of the Kingdom of Golconda, ruled the Deccan for almost 171 years. The seven rulers of the Golconda Kingdom, were all patrons of learning and were great builders. Together they contributed to the growth and development of Indo-Persian and Indo-Islamic literature and culture in Hyderabad. It was during the Qutb Shahi reign that Golconda became one of the leading markets in the world of diamonds, and pearls, apart from other products. After the Mughals in Delhi established control over the Deccan, it was left to be governed by a subedar or viceroy of the Mughal Emperor. The Governor of the Deccan, bore the title of Nizam-ul-Mulk. In 1724, Feroze Jung Asif Jah, declared his independence from Mughal rule to set up the Asif Jahi dynasty, thus becoming the first Nizam. It was in 1769 that Nizam Ali Khan Asif Jah II, shifted the capital to Hyderabad. The seven Nizam's of the Asif Jahi dynasty ruled the Deccan for nearly 224 years, right up to 1948, when they acceded to the Indian Union., post Independence.

The Nizams ensured the growth of Hyderabad both culturally and economically. The artificial lakes which are so famous today, like the Nizam Sagar, Tungabadra, Osman Sagar, Himayath Sagar, and others were constructed during their reign. Survey work on the Nagarjuna Sagar had also begun during this time. Hyderabad, under the Nizams, was the largest princely state in India, and in area was as large as England and Scotland put together. The Nizams were also great patrons of jewellery and like many of the other rulers of India’s erstwhile princely states had built up a fabulous collection of jewellery which has become renowned all over the world. “It was since the Nizams’ times that Hyderabad became so important for pearls,” says Devender Kumar Agarwal, Managing Partner Krishna Pearls & Jewellers. “Mughal jewellery used a lot of pearls and their importance grew.” Devender, who has 14 jewellery stores in Hyderabad and two in Mumbai, says that Hyderabad has pearls of every range – large and small, cultured and natural. “It developed as a world famous drilling centre and pearls from Japan and China were imported to the city, for processing,” says he. Jeetender Agarwal of Dreamz Diamond Jewellery agrees that “The processing and finishing of pearls in Hyderabad is very good, and they are supplied worldwide from here.” Apart from the processing of pearls, Hyderabad has also achieved expertise in the manufacture of pearl jewellery. Devender strongly believes that the manufacturing in Hyderabad is undergoing modernisation as well as developing rapidly on the design front. “From the simple five string and seven string necklaces, to modern, westernised jewellery for exports, Hyderabad produces it all,” says Devender. “Here you will find jewellery suited to the European markets as well as that for the traditional Indian market.” Jeetender adds, “The city is also famous for its antique and Victorian jewellery and its diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery.” He informs us that there are an estimated 50,000 Bengali babus working in the industry in the city. The diamond jewellery market particularly has grown substantially he feels. The city of Hyderabad has emerged as an important wholesale market for pearls, pearl jewellery as well as the Victorian style and diamond and colouredstone studded jewellery. “Traders from the North as well as from other southern cities come here to buy jewellery,” says Jeetender.

Hyderabad’s emergence as a city where many businesses have shifted and which has a sizable BPO and IT segment has meant that it has also developed as a healthy retail market. According to Jeetender, “It is the biggest retails markets in south India, with 50% sales to NRIs.” From the old bazaars around the Charminar to the newer market of Kothaguda and the modern malls springing up in the city, Hyderabad has a thriving jewellery retail trade. Laad bazaar, near Charminar is famous for its bangles and pearls. The Panjagutta area is also lined with shops retailing pearl jewellery. Jeetender concludes by saying “It is the design sense and the honesty of the Hyderabadi people that have made it such an important market.” Like the city itself, which has many aspects and strengths, the jewellery trade of Hyderabad also is richly multi-faceted.

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